Sacraments

  • Baptism

    The Sacrament of Baptism is often called "The door of the Church," because it is the first of the seven sacraments not only in time (since most Catholics receive it as infants) but in priority, since the reception of the other sacraments depends on it. Once baptized, a person becomes a member of the Church.  Traditionally, the rite (or ceremony) of baptism was held outside the doors of the main part of the church, to signify this fact.

     

     

     

     

     

     
    Doctrinal Statements

    • The Sacraments of Initiation are Baptism, Confirmation, and Eucharist.
    • The Risen Jesus commissioned the Apostles to baptize when he said, "Go, therefore, and make disciples of all nations, baptizing them in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit" (Mt 28:19-20).
    • Baptism gives a person birth into new life.  It is necessary for salvation and for entry into the Church.
    • The rite of Baptism consists in immersing the person in water three times or pouring water on his or her head three times while invoking the Holy Trinity:  the Father, the Son, and the Holy Spirit.
    • The effects of Baptism are delivery from all sins (Original and personal), reception of the grace of divine adoption, being made a member of Christ and a temple of the Holy Spirit, initiation into the Church, and being made a sharer in Christ's mission as priest, prophet, and king.
    • Baptism seals the person's soul with a permanent spiritual mark or character identifying one as belonging to Christ.  Because of this character, Baptism cannot be repeated.
    • People who die for the faith, catechumens who died before being baptized, and those who do not know Christ or the Church through no fault of their own but who, by the action of grace, seek God sincerely and do his will can be saved even without being baptized.
    • Infants have been baptized since apostolic times, for this is a gift from God and does not presuppose human merit.  Children are baptized in the faith of the Church.
    • Trusting in God's mercy, we confidently hope for the salvation of children who die without Baptism.
    • In time of necessity such as the danger of death, all persons can baptize.  The person baptizing must intend to do what the Church does, by pouring water three times on the candidate's head while saying "I baptize you in the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit."

    -- United States Catholic Catechism for Adults
    Part II. The Sacraments:  The Faith Celebrated pp. 197-198

     

  • Confirmation

    The reception of the sacrament of Confirmation is necessary for the completion of baptismal grace...."By the sacrament of Confirmation [the baptized] are more perfectly bound to the Church and are enriched with a special strength of the Holy Spirit." (CCC, no 1285, citing LG, no.11)

    Confirmation, together with Baptism and Eucharist, form the Sacraments of Initiation that are all intimately connected. In the Sacrament of Confirmation, the baptized person is "sealed with the gift of the Holy Spirit" and is strengthened for service to the Body of Christ.

    -- United States Catholic Catechism for Adults
    Part II. The Sacraments:  The Faith Celebrated p. 203

    Please contact Sue Huett, Director of Worship (618) 722-5038 for questions regarding the Sacrament of Confirmation

    Guidelines and Other Helpful Resources for Celebrating the Sacrament of Confirmation in the
    Diocese of Belleville

    pdf FORM A - Guidelines for the Person Preparing the Liturgy and for the Clergy (556 KB) - Updated September, 2017
    pdf FORM B - Guidelines for the Person Preparing the Confirmation Worship Aid (220 KB) - Updated September, 2017
    pdf FORM C - Guidelines for the Confirmation Sponsor (288 KB) - Updated September, 2017
    pdf FORM D - Guidelines for Choosing the Names of Saints for Confirmation (270 KB) - Updated September, 2017
    pdf FORM E - Guidelines for the Person Preparing the Confirmandi (488 KB) - Updated September, 2017
    Required Reading:  "Treating Saints Like Superheros is a Dangerous Game" by Robert Ellsberg - America Magazine - 2/17/17
    pdf FORM F - Guidelines for the Name Tags (221 KB) - Updated September, 2017
    pdf FORM G - Guidelines for Music Reprints and Permissions (137 KB) - Updated September, 2017

    pdf Suggested Hymns and Responsorial Psalms for Confirmation (142 KB) - Updated September, 2017
    Musical Score -  pdf "Receive the Power" (161 KB)
    pdf Websites and Resources for Clip Art Images (583 KB) - Updated September, 2017
    pdf Information Sheet for the Sacrament of Confirmation (150 KB) 
    - due from the parishes January 17, 2018
         

    The Order of Confirmation
    The Order of Confirmation and Principles for Making Changes in Other Ritual Books
    Rite of Confirmation, Chapter 1, English Only
    Rite of Confirmation, Chapter 1, English and Spanish

    Sample Worship Aids
    default Worship Aid (4.13 MB) - (Publisher Format)
    pdf Worship Aid (1.48 MB) - (Adobe Format)

    Music Reprints and Permissions
    Parishes that use copyrighted material are required to obtain a license to legally reproduce music and/or music text(s). The diocesan/chancery office license covers the liturgies, conferences, trainings, retreats, rallies, and activities that are organized and executed by the central office staff. This is not intended to cover worship in the local parishes (Sundays, School Masses, Confirmations, etc.). Even if the Bishop is in attendance or is presiding it is not considered a diocesan event.

    In previous years, parishes were required to obtain permission from every music publisher whose music was reprinted in their worship aid.  Only one license is required now. One License has brought together OCP, GIA and WLP and dozens of top sacred premier publishers under one company. With OneLicense.net, you can reproduce the words (lyrics) and music (melody) used by a congregation or organization in a religious service for songs owned or administered by the Member Publishers of One License. Reproduction may be in the form of a bulletin, program, order of service, song sheet, songbook, transparency, or by electronic storage and retrieval system for the one projection of words or music or both. Reproductions many not be permanently bound into a worship aid that is sold, published, or shared with other congregations.

    Your license is intended for the reproduction of words and/or music for the congregation or those attending the event. Specifically excluded are choir parts, accompaniments, full scores, and instrumental parts of any kind. Additionally, no choral music (octavos) may be reproduced, except that part of the work that may be identified in the score as intended for congregational singing (commonly called a music or reprint box). One License distributes royalties equitably to composers, authors, and publishers.

    Click here for more information about license options and prices. 

  • Eucharist

    The Church draws her life from the Eucharist.  This truth does not simply express a daily experience of faith, but recapitulates the heart of the mystery of the Church.  In a variety of ways, she joyfully experiences the constant fulfillment of the promise, "Lo, I am with you always, to the close of the age" (Mt 28:20), but in the Holy Eucharist, through the changing of the bread and wine into the Body and Blood of the Lord, she rejoices in this presence with unique intensity.  Ever since Pentecost, when the Church, the People of the New Covenant, began her pilgrim journey towards her heavenly homeland, the Divine Sacrament has continued to mark the passing of her days, filling with confident hope. (Pope John Paul II, On the Eucharist [Eccleisa de Eucharistia; EE], no. 1) 

    -- United States Catholic Catechism for Adults
    Part II. The Sacraments:  The Faith Celebrated p. 219

      Doctrinal Statements

    • Jesus instituted the Eucharistic sacrifice, the banquet of divine life, at the Last Supper.
    • We need to remember that the Eucharist is the summit and source of our Christian life.  Why?  Because in the Eucharist is found the entire treasure of the Church--Jesus Christ.
    • The Eucharistic celebration begins with the Introductory Rites and the Liturgy of the Word, followed by the Liturgy of the Eucharist--the preparation of the gifts, the Eucharistic Prayer (the prayer of thanksgiving and praise, including the consecration of the bread and wine), and the reception of Holy Communion.  The celebration concludes with the sending forth to serve the Lord.
    • The Eucharist is the memorial of Christ's saving life, death, and Resurrection, made present for our salvation by the action of the liturgy.
    • Christ, acting through the ministry of his priests, is both the priest offering the sacrifice and the victim being sacrificed.
    • "Only validly ordained priests can preside at the Eucharist and consecrate the bread and wine so that they become the Body and Blood of the Lord" (CCC, no. 1411).
    • The essential signs of the Eucharist for the Latin Church are unleavened wheat bread and grape wine.
    • At Mass, the consecrated bread is Christ's Body.  The consecrated wine is Christ's Blood.  Jesus Christ, whole and entire, is fully present under each form of the Eucharist.  He is substantially present in a way that is entirely unique.  This happens by the power of the Holy Spirit through the ministry of the priest's acting in the person of Christ during the Eucharistic Prayer. 

     

    -- United States Catholic Catechism for Adults
    Part II. The Sacraments:  The Faith Celebrated pp. 228-229

  • Reconciliation

    The Sacrament of Penance reconciles us with God.  "The whole power of the Sacrament of Penance consists in restoring us to God's grace and joining us with him in an intimate friendship" (CCC, no. 1468).

    This Sacrament also reconciles us with the Church.  Sin should never be understood as a private or personal matter, because it harms our relationship with others and may even break our loving communication with the Church.  The Sacrament of Penance repairs this break and has a renewing effect on the vitality of the Church itself.

    In this Sacrament, the penitent received the merciful judgment of God and is engaged on the journey of conversion that leads to future life with God.  The Church also recommends that a person go regularly to confession, even if only for venial sins.  This is because "the regular confession of our venial sins helps us form our consciences, fight against evil tendencies, let ourselves be healed by Christ and progress in the life of the Spirit" (CCC, no. 1458)

    -- United States Catholic Catechism for Adults
    Part II. The Sacraments:  The Faith Celebrated p. 242

    Coming Soon!

    Resources

    Liturgy Preparation Aid for Lent, Triduum, and the Easter Season - Year B - Word format
    Liturgy Preparation Aid for Lent, Triduum, and the Easter Season - Year B - PDF

     

    Doctrinal Statements

    • On Easter night Jesus appeared to the Apostles, greeted them with peace, and breathed on them, saying, "Receive the Holy Spirit, Whose sins you forgive are forgiven, and whose sins you retain are retained" (Jn 20:22-23).
    • "The Creed links 'the forgiveness of sins' with its profession of faith in the Holy Spirit, for the risen Christ entrusted to the apostles the power to forgive sins when he gave them the Holy Spirit" (CCC, no 984).
    • Sins committed before Baptism are forgiven by Baptism.  Sins committed after Baptism are forgiven in the Sacrament of Penance and Reconciliation, also called the Sacrament of Forgiveness, Confession, and Conversion.
    • Sin wounds our relationship with God and others and our human dignity.  Faith reveals to us the destructive force of sin in our lives and the world.
    • The path back to God after sin is a process of conversion initiated by his grace.  The return to God includes sorrow for sin and the resolve to sin no more.
    • In the Sacrament of Penance and Reconciliation, the acts of the penitent are contrition, confession, and satisfaction.  The act of the priest is absolution for the sins of the penitent.
    • Perfect contrition arises from love for God; imperfect contrition results from other motives.
    • The penitent, after an examination of conscience, needs to confess all mortal sins.  While it is not necessary to confess venial sins, the Church strongly recommends this practice.
    • The priest proposes a penance to the penitent to repair the harm due to sin and to restore the penitent's commitment to be a disciple of Christ.
    • Individual confession of grave sins according to kind and number is the only ordinary way of receiving absolution and reconciliation with God and the Church.
    • The effects of the Sacrament of Penance and Reconciliation include reconciliation with God and the Church, peace of conscience and spiritual consolation, the remission of eternal punishment due to mortal sin as well as some degree of temporal punishments, and a greater power to face spiritual challenges (cf. CCC, no. 1496).
    • "Through indulgences the faithful can obtain the remission of temporal punishment resulting from sin, for themselves and also for the souls in Purgatory" (CCC, no. 1498).

    -- United States Catholic Catechism for Adults
    Part II. The Sacraments:  The Faith Celebrated pp. 244-245

  • Anointing of the Sick

    The Anointing of the Sick "is not a sacrament for those only who are at the point of death.  Hence as soon as anyone of the faithful begins to be in danger of death from sickness or old age, the fitting time to receive this sacrament has certainly already arrived" (CCC, no. 1514, citing SC, no. 73).

    When the Sacrament of Anointing of the Sick is given, the hoped-for effect is that, if it be God's will, the person be physically healed of illness. But even if there is no physical healing, the primary effect of the Sacrament is spiritual healing by which the sick person receives the Holy Spirit's gift of peace and courage to deal with the difficulties that accompany serious illness or the frailty of old age. The Holy Spirit renews our faith in God and helps us understand the temptations of the Evil One to be discouraged and despairing in the face of suffering and death.  Also, a sick person's sins are forgiven if he or she was not able to go to Confession prior to the celebration of the Sacrament of the Anointing of the Sick.

    -- United States Catholic Catechism for Adults
    Part II. The Sacraments:  The Faith Celebrated pp. 253-254

    Doctrinal Statements 

    • "Is anyone among you sick?  He should summon the presbyters [priests] of the church, and they should pray over him and anoint [him] with oil in the name of the Lord, and the prayer of faith will save the sick person, and the Lord will raise him up.  If he has committed any sins, he will be forgiven" (Jas 5:14-15).
    • The Sacrament of Anointing of the Sick is for those who are seriously ill or in danger of death or suffering the difficulties of old age.  The Sacrament may be received each time the believer falls seriously ill or an illness worsens (cf. CCC, no. 1529).
    • Only priests and bishops may administer the Sacrament of the Anointing of the Sick.  This is because one effect of this Sacrament can be the forgiveness of sin.  They use Oil of the Sick blessed by the bishop or, in necessity, an oil blessed by the priest.
    • The rite of Anointing of the Sick includes the anointing of the forehead and hands of the sick or other parts of the body accompanied by the liturgical prayer that asks for the grace of the Sacrament.
    • The gifts of this Sacrament include uniting the sick person with Christ's Passion, for the person's well-being and that of the Church; strength to endure patiently the sufferings of illness and old age; the forgiveness of sins if the person was unable to receive the Sacrament of Penance; and preparation for the passage to eternal life. 

    -- United States Catholic Catechism for Adults
    Part II. The Sacraments:  The Faith Celebrated pp. 257-258

  • Marriage

    The vocation to marriage is written in the very nature of man and woman as they came from the hand of the Creator.  Marriage is not a purely human institution despite the many variations it may have undergone through the centuries in different cultures, social structures and spiritual attitudes. (CCC, no. 1603)

    -- United States Catholic Catechism for Adults
    Part II. The Sacraments:  The Faith Celebrated p. 279

    pdf Updated Information on the Order of Celebrating Matrimony, Second Ritual Edition (3.81 MB)
    Advice from the United States Conference on Catholic Bishops Committee on Divine Worship - includes questions concerning catechumens and the Order of Celebrating Matrimony and Best Practices for the Procession.

    Pastoral Guidelines for Marriage Preparation (includes Your Wedding in the Catholic Church)
    These Guidelines were prepared by the Department of Pastoral Services' Committee on Marriage Preparation, Diocese of Belleville 

  • Holy Orders

    The Essential Rite of Holy Orders

    The essential rite of the sacrament of Holy Orders for all three degrees consists in the bishop's imposition of hands on the head of the ordinand and in the bishop's specific consecratory prayer asking God for the outpouring of the Holy Spirit and his gifts proper to ministry to which the candidate is being ordained.  (CCC, no. 1573)

    -- United States Catholic Catechism for Adults
    Part II. The Sacraments:  The Faith Celebrated p. 267


    Doctrinal Statements

    • Through Baptism all the members of the Church share in the priesthood of Christ.  This is known as the "common priesthood of the faithful."
    • Through Holy Orders there is another participation in Christ's priesthood, the ministerial priesthood of bishop and priest.  This differs in essence from the common priesthood because it confers a sacred power for the service of the faithful.
    • The ordained ministry occurs in three degrees or orders:  bishop, priest, and deacon.  These ministries are essential for the life of the Church.
    • Bishops receive the fullness of the Sacrament of Holy Orders.  They are the chief teachers, sanctifiers, and shepherds in their dioceses.
    • "Priests are united with the bishops in priestly dignity and at the same time depend on them in the exercise of their pastoral functions; they are called to be the bishops' prudent co-workers" (CCC, no. 1595).  With the bishop, priests form a presbyteral (priestly) community and assume with him the pastoral mission for a particular parish.
    • Deacons receive the Sacrament of Holy Orders, but not the ministerial priesthood.  Through ordination, the deacon is conformed to Christ, who came to serve, not to be served.  Deacons in the Latin Church may baptize, read the Gospel, preach the homily, assist the bishop or priest in the celebration of the Eucharist, assist at and bless marriages, and preside at funerals.  They dedicate themselves to charitable endeavors, which was their ministerial role in New Testament times.
    • "The essential rite of the Sacrament of Holy Orders for all three degrees consists in the bishop's imposition of hands on the head of the ordinand [man to be ordained] and in the bishop's specific consecratory prayer" (CCC, no 1573).  Ordination confers a permanent sacramental character.
    • Only men may be ordained.
    • Normally in the Western Church, ordination to priesthood is conferred only on those men who freely promise lifelong celibacy.
    • Only bishops may confer the Sacrament of Holy Orders in the three degrees.

    -- United States Catholic Catechism for Adults
    Part II. The Sacraments:  The Faith Celebrated pp. 273-274

    For more information about Holy Orders in the Diocese of Belleville, please contact:

    Vocations         Deacon Formation
    Reverend Nicholas Junker, Director
    (618) 722-5035
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      Very Reverend Eugene H. Wojcik, V.F, Director
    (618) 826-2444 (parish)
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    Mrs. Patricia (Patti) Warner
    (618) 722-5043
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    Mrs. Patricia (Patti) Warner, Associate Director
    (618) 722-5043
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      Deacon Robert J. Lanter, Coordinator of Deacons
    (618) 722-5042
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Contact

Diocesan Pastoral Center
2620 Lebanon Avenue, Building #2
Belleville, IL 62221
FAX:  618-257-2969

Director of Worship

Mrs. Sue A. Huett
618-722-5038
shuett@diobelle.org

Administrative Assistant

Mrs. Mary M. Fournie
618-722-5040
mfournie@diobelle.org

 

Featured Events

Through the Doorway 2018

Year Round Catechumenate
The Vision
Nick Wagner, Presenter

Sunday, January 28, 2018
King's House Retreat & Renewal Center
700 North 66th Street
Belleville, Illinois 62223
12:15 pm - Registration
1:00 pm - Presentation

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